fuckyeahstrangemythology

mrockefeller:

Here are all 9 pieces from my first thesis project!

At the beginning of the semester, I read folktales from around the world and sought out interesting imagery and characters to develop into 9 full page illustrations. As I made each illustration, I did a ton of research into the clothing, symbols, patterns, and other related imagery from the each story’s culture.

I am fascinated by old stories and how they have been passed down and shaped future stories. I learned a lot from this project, but I feel like I’ve only scratched the surface! There is so much more to these unique cultures, and I’ll continue to draw inspiration from them.

For each individually, and some process sketches see the links below:

The Fisherman and the Gruagach of Tricks (Ireland)

The Giant Who Had no Heart In His Body (Norway)

The Firebird and the Horse of Power (Russia)

Sinbad and the Seven Voyages (Middle East)

The Magic Brocade (China)

Urashima (Japan)

Hats to Disappear With (Korea)

The Search for the Magic Lake ( Ecuador)

Oni and the Great Bird (West Africa, Yoruba Tribe)

All are available as prints on my inprnt!

Thank you everyone for your support over the past year! Here’s to a great 2014!

fuckyeahstrangemythology
the-fae:

Merrow (from Gaelic murúch) or Murrough (Galloway) is the Scottish and Irish Gaelic equivalent of the mermaid and mermen of other cultures. These beings are said to appear as human from thewaist up but have the body of a fish from the waist down. They have a gentle, modest, affectionate and benevolent disposition.
There are other names pertaining to them in Gaelic: Muir-gheilt, Samhghubha, Muidhuachán, and Suire. They would seem to have been around for millennia because according to the bardic chroniclers, when the Milesians first landed on Irish shores the Suire, or sea-nymphs, played around them on their passage.
The merrow were capable of attachment to human beings and there are reports of them inter-marrying and living among humans for many years. However, most times they eventually return to their former homes beneath the sea.
{http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merrow}   

the-fae:

Merrow (from Gaelic murúch) or Murrough (Galloway) is the Scottish and Irish Gaelic equivalent of the mermaid and mermen of other cultures. These beings are said to appear as human from thewaist up but have the body of a fish from the waist down. They have a gentle, modest, affectionate and benevolent disposition.

There are other names pertaining to them in Gaelic: Muir-gheiltSamhghubhaMuidhuachán, and Suire. They would seem to have been around for millennia because according to the bardic chroniclers, when the Milesians first landed on Irish shores the Suire, or sea-nymphs, played around them on their passage.

The merrow were capable of attachment to human beings and there are reports of them inter-marrying and living among humans for many years. However, most times they eventually return to their former homes beneath the sea.

{http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merrow}   

fuckyeahstrangemythology
ancient-egypts-secrets:

Heqet (Heket)
A goddess of childbirth and fertility, depicted as a frog, or a woman with the head of a frog. According to one tradition, she was the wife of Khnum, the creator god of Abu (Elephantine). He created each person on his potter’s wheel, and she breathed life into them before they were placed in their mother’s womb. Pregnant women wore amulets depicting Heqet for protection, and during the Middle Kingdom ritual ivory knives and clappers inscribed with her name were used to ward off evil during childbirth. She could also bring on labour and offer protection during labour. 
Heqet was depicted as a frog because, to the Egyptians, the frog was a symbol of life and fertility, since millions of them were born after the annual inundation of the Nile.

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Heqet (Heket)

A goddess of childbirth and fertility, depicted as a frog, or a woman with the head of a frog. According to one tradition, she was the wife of Khnum, the creator god of Abu (Elephantine). He created each person on his potter’s wheel, and she breathed life into them before they were placed in their mother’s womb. Pregnant women wore amulets depicting Heqet for protection, and during the Middle Kingdom ritual ivory knives and clappers inscribed with her name were used to ward off evil during childbirth. She could also bring on labour and offer protection during labour. 

Heqet was depicted as a frog because, to the Egyptians, the frog was a symbol of life and fertility, since millions of them were born after the annual inundation of the Nile.

archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]